Knit Along: Angora Lace Scarf From Lion Brand Studio - Day 5 | Author Allie Pleiter

Knit Along: Angora Lace Scarf from Lion Brand Studio - Day 5

What comes after the bind off?
Knit Along: Angora Lace Scarf from Lion Brand Studio - Day 5 1
Some patterns you can slip the project right on and go.  Heaven knows I’ve done my share of finishing a piece hours (okay, sometimes even minutes) before I planned to wear it.  Not so with lacework.  It’s okay when it’s done, but it’s never really a work of art until you’ve blocked it.



Can’t you just press it with an iron?
Knit Along: Angora Lace Scarf from Lion Brand Studio - Day 5 2
Almost never.  Blocking requires soaking–or as the famous opinionated knitter Elizabeth Zimmermann calls it “giving it a bath.”  I love the tender touch that term implies.  And it’s the perfect visual for the task.  I let my babies soak for about ten minutes (as long as it takes me to set up the blocking board I use on my dining room table) in Dawn Blue dishwashing liquid and tepid water.  After a careful rinse in similar temperature water, I pin them to the board.  A striped beach towel is especially useful for pieces involving straight lines like this scarf, because you’ve got your guidelines ready to go.


Knit Along: Angora Lace Scarf from Lion Brand Studio - Day 5 3
What does blocking accomplish?
In even simple lacework like this scarf, blocking opens up the stitches, helps things lay flat, and gives the work an even feel.  I think blocking makes any knitted piece feel “airier,” if I can manufacture a word.  Scientifically, it allows the fibers to relax and line up nicely next to each other.  After all, everyone–from small children to dogs to romance author knitters–behaves more nicely after a bath.
Give it a day or so to dry, and I’ll come back to show you the final product.
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